Jump to content

Photo

Szkodliwość 17aa SAA na watrobe

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply

#1
naja

naja

    NAJA KFD

  • Aktywny user KFD
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5212 posts
  • Wiek: 40
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    A Closer Look at Steroid Liver Toxicity - Part I
    by: Michael Fischer

    Pop quiz time! True or false?

    1) 17-alpha alkylated steroids are harder for the liver to metabolize, so it has to work harder to break them down.
    2) All 17- alpha alkylated steroids are liver toxic.
    3) Non 17-alpha alkylated steroids are not liver toxic.

    It may surprise you to know all of the above are false . Read on to learn why.

    It's a well known fact that 17-alpha alkylated steroids are liver toxic. Just how toxic depends on who you listen to. The media and many physicians think they are deadly, whereas many online ‘bros' think they are practically harmless. There seems to be a lot of confusion on the subject, even by those who are well read on the subject of steroids. The truth is that it depends heavily on the individual using the steroid, as well as the actual steroid being used; and the dose and the duration of use. Hopefully we can dispel some rumors and gain an understanding of how these substances are toxic, and how to reduce or prevent toxicity as well!
    Toxic Effects

    What are the known toxic effects of oral steroids? By far the most common toxicity seen is intrahepatic cholestasis. In general, cholestasis is any condition where bile flow is stopped, and with oral anabolics it occurs within the liver. Normally, bile is released into the small intestine and where its main function is to aid the in the absorption of fats and fatlike substances. This stoppage prevents bile salts from being released into the bile duct, causing a buildup within the hepatocyte. This buildup can be toxic to the hepatocytes over time. Jaundice, a yellowing of the skin and eyes, is related to cholestasis. This occurs because bilirubin (a product of red blood cell breakdown), is normally eliminated through the bile. During cholestasis, this builds up and produces a yellowish color in the skin and eyes, and is a tell tale sign that something bad is happening. Jaundice is a rare thing to see except in newborn babies, and a healthcare professional should be sought out if you notice these symptoms. The type of cholestasis normally seen from oral steroid use is clinically categorized as ‘bland cholestasis' because there is no inflammation accompanying the cholestasis. This type of cholestasis is fully reversible upon cessation of the offending agent.

    In addition to cholestasis, other reported toxic effects are peliosis hepatis and hepatic adenoma. Peliosis hepatis is the presence of blood-filled cavities in the liver. This is a rare occurrence, and the theory is that peliosis hepatis results because of liver blood outflow obstruction at the junction of sinusoids and centrilobular veins. What causes this? It is believed to be related to cholestasis, which causes growth (swelling) of the hepatocytes. In AAS users the obstruction may be due to the prolapse of hyperplasic hepatocytes into the hepatic venule wall. This is good news because this means if cholestasis can be prevented, so can peliosis hepatis.

    Hepatic adenoma is mentioned several times in the literature as a possible effect of oral steroid use. The prevalence of this is extremely rare and seems to only occur after months or years of continuous use. It is very likely associated with prolonged cholestasis as well. In my opinion, it should not be a concern unless someone in your family has got this from an oral steroid (including birth control pills), and the real focus of safety should be on preventing cholestasis.

    The liver has numerous important functions in the body, but its relevant functions for this article include drug metabolism and excretion, and secretion of bile salts and bicarbonate for digestion.

    When orally ingested testosterone is absorbed in the small intestine it is transported to the liver via the portal vein. Here it is nearly 100% metabolized to a 17-keto steroid by the enzyme 17-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase. This reaction is very rapid and only when high amounts of testosterone are ingested does the enzyme system get saturated, allowing some testosterone to get by unchanged. Other reactions are possible such as reduction of the ketone group on the 3 carbon, but these are not as important to toxicity of the steroid.

    With 17-alpha alkylated steroids, this conversion from a 17-hydroxy to a 17-keto steroid is prevented. This is key, and if you remember anything from this article, remember the next few sentences. The main difference between 17-aa's and regular steroids is that one retains a free 17 hydroxyl group and one does not, when going through the liver. The reason that 17-aa are toxic is because the free hydroxyl is able to be conjugated with glucuronic acid, forming a D ring 17-glucuronide. It is not the 17-aa steroid that is liver toxic but rather its 17-glucuronide metabolite. So it's not that these steroids are harder to metabolize, but rather the way they are metabolized causes them to be toxic.

    This fact goes for androgens as well as estrogens, 17-alpha alkylated and non 17-alpha alkylated steroids. Let me clarify that last part, normal steroids would be liver toxic if they did not get metabolized to the 17-keto steroid, so it may be more correct to say they are potentially toxic, but are not in normal use. An intravenous infusion of estradiol-17- glucuronide, testosterone-17-glucuronide or dihydrotestosterone-17-glucuronide would cause cholestasis just as oral methyltestosterone or ethinylestradiol does.

    So what about the supposedly liver friendly oxandrolone? The following excerpt summarizes why it is liver friendly:

    Unlike other orally administered C17alpha-alkylated AASs, the novel chemical configuration of oxandrolone confers a resistance to liver metabolism as well as marked anabolic activity. In addition, oxandrolone appears not to exhibit the serious hepatotoxic effects (jaundice, cholestatic hepatitis, peliosis hepatis, hyperplasias and neoplasms) attributed to the C17alpha-alkylated AASs.

    I submit that its resistance to metabolism (17-glucuronidation) is the reason for its lack of toxicity.

    So we now know 17-glucuronides are to blame for liver toxicity. Now let's examine how they cause cholestasis. Bile flow is regulated in two ways; bile salt independent flow, and bile salt dependent flow.

    Bile salt independent flow is a passive process controlled mainly by the osmotic factors glutathione and bicarbonate. The exact mechanisms are not known, but it is known that biliary glutathione levels decrease significantly soon after a toxic steroid is administered. The total hepatic glutathione increases, which seems to indicate that glutathione transport to the bile duct becomes impaired. Bicarbonate transport to the bile is similarly impaired, but it is not due to impaired transporters, rather the gradient becomes diminished by some type of bicarbonate reuptake. These processes occur rapidly and are the first toxicities observed.

    Bile salt dependent flow is an active process that is controlled by numerous membrane bound transporters. Specifically ATP bind cassette (ABC) transporters transport the bile salts from the blood into the hepatocyte (basolateral), and then from the hepatocyte to the bile (canilicular). The pumping of bile salts into the bile is the main force that drives bile flow, which is what we want for normal functioning. Although both basolateral and canilicular transporters are probably involved in hormone induced cholestasis, the most examined is the canilicular bile salt export pump (BSEP). Oral steroid glucuronides are known to interact with the promoter region of the gene for this transporter and to repress its expression. Besides repression of the gene, other factors may decrease the BSEP function as well. The transport of the BSEP from its point of synthesis to the canilicular membrane can be impaired in cholestasis, providing functional transporters in the wrong place within the cell.

    Finally there is the genetic component. There is a great deal of genetic variation in ABC transporters among the population. Certain people are at a higher risk for developing cholestasis than others, and in the near future it will be possible for you to determine what genetic polymorphisms you have in your hepatic transporters. This should be very valuable information for anyone who is planning on taking a potentially liver toxic drug, whatever it may be. In the meantime, the best method for determining if you are at risk for cholestatic problems is to look to your family. Cholestatic conditions to be mindful of are cholestasis of pregnancy, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, and Dubin-Johnson syndrome. Having close relatives which any of these conditions possibly puts you at a greater risk of having toxicity issues with oral AAS.

    In this article, we have explored the specifics how oral steroids cause liver dysfunction that can lead to toxicity. In part 2 of this article, we will look at methods to prevent or eliminate the major toxicities associated with using oral AAS.
    References

    J Clin Gastroenterol 39, Supp. 2, April 2005

    Toxicol Lett. 1994 Dec;74(3):221-33.

    Drugs. 2004;64(7):725-50.

    Histopathology. 1977 Jul;1(4):225-46.

    Drug Metab Rev. 1983;14(5):1005-19.

    J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1981 Jul;218(1):63-73.

    Int J Sports Med (1981 May):2(2):101-5
    • 0

    #2
    Drops

    Drops

      eye contact

    • Spamer ;)
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3939 posts
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    Nie chciało Ci się przetłumaczyć? Coś tam zdekodowałem, ale to głównie naukowy bełkot. Trzeba by to po polsku na chłopski rozum przetłumaczyć i podwiesić, bo ciekawy temat

    Edited by dr_drops, 08 August 2010 - 08:40 AM.

    • 0

    #3
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    moge to przetłumaczyć, jest potrzeba ?? %-)


    jestem w trakcie %)
    • 0

    #4
    Drops

    Drops

      eye contact

    • Spamer ;)
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3939 posts
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    Przetłumacz, na pewno więcej zrozumiem w ojczystym języku :)
    • 0

    #5
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    Rzut oka na sterydy hepatoksyczne. Cz1



    Czas na quiz, prawda czy fałsz?

    1) 17-alfa alkilowane sterydy są trudniejsze do zmetabolizwoania przez wątrobę, więc musi ona ciężej pracować aby je rozłożyć/złamać.
    2) Wszystkie 17-alfa alkilowane sterydy są hepatoksyczne.
    3) Sterydy bez grupy 17-alfa alkilowej nie są hepatoksyczne.

    Może was to zaskoczy ale wszystkie powyższe stwierdzenia są fałszywe. Czytaj dalej żeby dowiedzieć się więcej.

    Ogólnie wiadomym faktem jest, że 17-aa SAA są toksyczne, jednak to jak bardzo zależy od tego kogo słuchasz. Zdaniem mediów i lekarzy są śmiertelne, podczas gdy wielu chłopaków w necie twierdzi, że są praktycznie nieszkodliwe. Wygląda na to, że jest dużo niepewności na ten temat, nawet u tych, którzy długo siedzą w temacie sterydów. Prawda jest taka, że bardzo dużo zależy od użytkownika, sterydu oraz dawki i czasu podawania. Na szczęście możemy rozwiać część wątpliwości oraz zdobyć zrozumienie na temat sposobu w jaki te substancje są toksyczne, oraz jak zredukować lub wyeliminować ich toksyczność!

    Efekty toksyczności

    Jakie są znane efekty toksyczności orali? Jak do tej pory, najbardziej powszechną dolegliwością jest zastój żółci wywołany niedrożnością wewnątrzwątrobowych dróg żółciowych (z.ż.w.n.w). Ogólnie rzecz ujmując jest to stan gdzie przepływ żółci jest zatrzymana, co spowodowane jest doustnym podawaniem anabolików. Normalnie, żółć uwalniana jest do jelita cienkiego gdzie jej główną funkcją jest pomaganie we wchłanianiu tłuszczy i substancji tłuszczopodobnych. To wstrzymanie zapobiega uwalnianiu soli żółciowych do kanału żółciowego, powodując akumulacje wewnątrz hepatocytu, co z czasem może być dla niego toksyczne. Żółtaczka, żółknięcie skóry i oczu jest silnie powiązane z z.ż.w.n.w. w trakcie którego powyższe objawy są znakiem, że coś dzieje się źle. Żółtaczka występuje rzadko (poza noworodkami) lecz powinno się niezwłocznie skonsultować z lekarzem jeśli zauważymy któryś z symptomów. Typ z.ż.w.n.w powodowany przez sterydy oralne jest w medycynie skategoryzowany jako łagodny ponieważ nie występuje zapalenie towarzyszące zatorowi. Ten typ zatoru jest całkowicie odwracalny po odstawieniu szkodzącego środka.

    Oprócz zatoru odnotowano inne dolegliwości spowodowane środkami hepatoksycznymi; plamicę wątrobową i gruczolak wątrobowy (łagodny nowotwór wątroby, występujący głównie u kobiet stosujących doustną antykoncepcję hormonalną, zbudowany z hepatocytów. Może ulegać transformacji do nowotworu złośliwego.) Plamica wątrobowa objawia się powstawaniem jam wypełnionych krwią. Jest to rzadka przypadłość która w teorii spowodowana jest wyciekiem krwi utrudniającym przepływ w zatokach i centrilobular %-) żył .Czym to jest spowodowane?
    Teoria głosi, że dzieje się to przez rozrost hepatocytów. U użytkowników SAA dolegliwość ta może być spowodowana opadaniem przerośniętych hepatocytów na ścianki małych żyłek (? venule)

    Gruczolak wątrobowy jest wymieniany w literaturze jako możliwy efekt używania SAA. Występowanie jest ekstremalnie rzadkie i prawdopodobnie występuje jako efekt wieloletniego stosowania orali. Najprawdopodobniej jest również powiązane z przedłużającym się z.ż.w.n.w. Jeśli nikt w twojej rodzinie nie miał tego schorzenia przez nadużywanie sterydów nie powinieneś rozważać gruczolaka jako potencjalnego zagrożenia. Najlepiej zapobiegać jego powstawaniu poprzez zapobieganie powstawania z.ż.w.n.w.

    Wątroba ma wiele ważnych funkcji w organizmie, lecz ta która interesuje nas to metabolizm i wydalanie leków oraz wydzielanie soli żółciowych.

    Gdy oralnie podany testosteron zostanie wchłonięty w jelicie cienkim, transportowany jest do wątroby żyłą wrotną wątroby. Jest tam prawie w 100% metabolizowany do 17-keto steroidu przez enzym 17-hydroxysteroidową dehydrogeneze . Ta reakcja jest bardzo gwałtowna i zachodzi gdy podana jest duża dawka testosteronu i systemy enzymatyczny jest nasycony, pozwalając części testosteronu przejść dalej w niezmienionej formie.

    W przypadku sterydów 17aa ta reakcja nie zachodzi, to jest klucz do zrozumienia tematu więc jeśli pamiętasz coś z tego artykułu zapamiętaj kolejne kilka zdań. Główna różnica między sterydami z grupą 17aa a bez niej jest to, że jedne zatrzymują wolną grupę 17-hydroxylową a drugie nie, gdy przechodzą przez wątrobę. Powód, dla którego sterydy 17aa są toksyczne dla wątroby- wolna grupa hydroksylowa ma możliwość wiązania się z kwasem glukuronowym, formując pierścień 17-glukoronowy. Wychodzi na to że toksyczny jest nie sam steryd 17aa ale właśnie metabolit- kwas 17-glukoronowy. Czyli odpowiadając na pytanie 1, to nie sam steryd jest trudny do zmetabolizowania, lecz raczej sposób w jaki to się dzieje powoduje, że są one toksyczne.

    Ten fakt odnosi się zarówno do androgenów jak i estrogenów, 17aa oraz nie-17aa sterydów. Pozwólcie, że to rozjaśnię. Normalne sterydy były by hepatoksyczne jeśli nie były by metabolizowane do 17-keto steroidów, więc bardziej prawdziwe będzie stwierdzenie, że są potencjalnie toksyczne ale nie podczas normalnego stosowania.
    Dożylne podanie 17-glukoronwego dht, estradiolu lub testosteronu spowodowało by z.ż.w.n.w. tak samo jak np. metylotestosteron.

    Więc jak jest z rzekomo przyjaznym dla wątroby oxandrolonem?

    Inaczej niż inne sterydy 17aa oxandrolon z powodu swojej budowy chemicznej jest odporny na metabolizowanie w wątrobie. Dodatkowo nie wykazuje aż tak silnego działania hepatoksycznego przypisywanego innym sterydom 17aa.

    Twierdze, że jego odporność na metabolizacje (17-glukoronidazacja) jest przyczyną jego nietoksyczności.

    Tak więc wiemy, że 17-glukoronidy nie są hepatoksyczne, więc w jaki sposób wywołują z.ż.w.n.w? Przepływ żółci jest regulowany poprzez niezależny i zależny przepływ soli żółciowych.

    Niezależny przepływ żółci jest procesem pasywnym regulowanym głownie przez czynniki osmotyczne; glutation i biwęglan. Dokładny mechanizm ich działanie nie jest znany ale wiadomo, że glutation żółciowy jest wyraźnie obniżony niedługo po zażyciu toksycznego sterydu. Całkowity glutation wątrobowy rośnie, co wskazuje na to, że transport glutationu do dróg żółciowych zostaje ograniczony/osłabiony. Transport biwęglanu do żółci jest podobnie ograniczny ale nie z przyczyny osłabionych transporterów lecz raczej gradient zostaje zmniejszony przez jakieś ponownie uchwycone biwęglany. Ten procesy zachodzą gwałtownie i są pierwszymi toksynami do zaobserwowania.

    Zależny przepływ soli żółciowych jest aktywnym procesem, który jest kontrolowany przez wiele transporterów z błon granicznych. Szczególnie transportery kaset związanych(?) transportują sole żółciowe z krwi do hepatocytów, a dalej z hepatocytów do żółci. Pompowanie soli żółciowych do żółci jest główną siłą napędzającą przepływ żółci, który jest tym czym chcemy od normalnego funkcjonowania organizmu. Chociaż oba transportery B i C(kanalikowy) są prawdopodobnie zaangażowane w hormonalnym zatorze dróg żółciowych, najbardziej zbadanym jest kanalikowa eksportowa pompa soli żółciowych. Glukoronidy sterydów oralnych są znane z interakcji z regionem genu odpowiedzialnym za transporter oraz są wstanie stłumić jego wydzielanie.
    Poza tłumieniem działania genu inne czynniki również mogą obniżać funkcje BSEP . Upośledzone działanie BSEP może źle kierować wewnątrz komórki sprawnymi transporterami między punktem syntezy a błoną kanalikową co może doprowadzić do zatoru dróg żółciowych.

    W końcu swój wkład w całość ma składnik genetyczny. Jest duże zróżnicowanie genetyczne transporterów pośród populacji. Dla pewnej grupy ludzi istnieje większe ryzyko rozwinięcia zatoru żółciowego niż u innych i w niedalekiej przyszłości będziesz mógł sprawdzić, który wielopostaciowy typ genetyczny masz w swoich transporterach wątrobowych. To powinna być bardzo istotna informacja dla każdego kto planuje używać hepatoksycznych medykamentów, cokolwiek to by to nie było. Jak do tej pory najlepszym sposobem na sprawdzenie czy u kogoś w naszej rodzinie nie występował zator dróg żółciowych. (kolejne zdanie jest średnio istotne) Mając bliskich krewnych z wymienionymi w tekście objawami powoduje, że podejmujemy o wiele większe ryzyko stosując toksyczne oralne saa.
    • 0

    #6
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    nie skopiowały sie moje przypisy %-)


    1.Ja to rozumiem, jako by te komory z krwią blokowały komunikacje między tymi dwoma „rzeczami” ale dla dociekliwych tutaj link do Wiki gdzie jest to jako tako wytłumaczone http://en.wikipedia....obules_of_liver
    2.Venule (n.) A small vein; a veinlet; specifically (Zool.), one of the small branches of the veins of the wings in insects.

    3.W tekście jest excrection, ale w tym sensie to chodzi raczej o wydalanie niż wydzielanie.
    http://en.wikipedia....d_dehydrogenase
    5.Dalej jest nieistotne dla tematu zdanie. Sam autor tak pisze %)
    6.Tu miałem problem z przetłumaczeniem.
    7.Tutaj przetłumaczyłem to dość pobieżnie, uchwycony jest sens zdania ale nie udało mi się znaleźć polskich odpowiedników dla „basolateral”. BSEP jest tłumaczone dość dosłownie ale chyba każdy rozumie o co chodzi.
    8.Glucoronides??
    9.Patrz punkt 7
    10.Dość hardkorowe zdanko, trudno oddać dosłowny sens. O.o
    • 0

    #7
    Drops

    Drops

      eye contact

    • Spamer ;)
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3939 posts
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    Dobra robota kolego. %)

    No więc, jaka jest odpowiedź? Szkodliwość 17aa SAA na wątrobę - prawda czy mit?
    Może ktoś zrozumiał z tego artykułu więcej niż ja %-)
    • 0

    #8
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    Sens generalnie jest taki, że grupa 17aa sama w sobie nie szkodzi i że jak masz w rodzinie kogoś kto ma genetycznie cos zlego z wątroba to podwójnie ryzykujesz %-)
    generalnie to jest tak jak było tylko autor pokazal ze to inne mechanizmy steruja tym ze jest toksyczne lub nie;)



    jest troche literowek w tym tekscie ale wybaczcie
    • 0

    #9
    mamvga

    mamvga

      34latek robi miensnie xD XD :p ;P

    • Użytkownicy
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2544 posts
  • Wiek: 35
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:ełrochem
    • Staż [mies.]: 10lat
    nie jedź na mecie dłużej niż 8 tyg jak jakieś question zrób sobie 4-6 tyg i zbadaj wątrobę czy mozesz dłużej
    kup sobie najelpszy esencjale forte a po hepatil lub liv 52 zachwalany na zachodzie i w us
    cholesterol ciśnienie i witaminy swoja drogą

    Edited by mamvga, 08 August 2010 - 18:43 PM.

    • 0

    #10
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    mamgva przeczytaj ze zrozumieniem to co napisałem %-)
    • 0

    #11
    naja

    naja

      NAJA KFD

    • Aktywny user KFD
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 5212 posts
  • Wiek: 40
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    jednym z wnioskow wprost wyrazonym wteksie jest fakt ze np oxandrolon bedac 17aa jes znacznie slabiej "hepatotoksyczny" od innych saa 17aa ze wgledu na swoja budowe uniemozliwiajaca.... doczytaj dalej.
    jednym slowem sama grupa 17aa jest szkodliwa a okonkretna budowa konkretnego saa.
    • 0

    #12
    naja

    naja

      NAJA KFD

    • Aktywny user KFD
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 5212 posts
  • Wiek: 40
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    Pakerwus jak ci sie chce to tlumacz dla uzytkowników- ja nieststy niemam czasu na stukanie tego teraz tutaj.

    We all know that the alpha alkylated steroids are hepatotoxic, right….. But, is there actually any truth to this? We’ve been told for years that if you take 17 alpha-alkylated steroids, you will eventually run into liver problems. Never combine 17 aa’s, never go beyond 50mg day, never go longer than 4 weeks, etc. All of this is crap! As I we walk you through some studies, today, you’ll see 17 alpha-alkylated steroids can be hepatotoxic but not to the degree you would think.

    To make a steroid hepatotoxic, you need only a small change to a steroid molecule; A strong bond that cannot readily be down broken by enzymes in the liver. This may be a bond at the 17th position, or even at the 1st position (as in methenolone or proviron). Because the liver cannot easily break the steroid down before it is released in to the blood stream, this also results in the steroid to becoming more orally bio-available.

    We can see that the liver has to work harder to break down these steroids. Enzymes in the blood and tissue easily metabolize other steroids such as Testosterone. Commonly, this increase in liver activity has been viewed as a harmful process, but as you will see, this increase is, in and of itself, irrelevant. The liver is THE filter of the human body -- it can figure out what to do with just about anything. The only real problem comes in when one keeps their liver at full blast for long periods of time.

    Let’s look at some studies showing the hepatotoxicity of steroids. Here's one of my favorites, a study published in 1979[1]. Essentially, researches did a study of deaths caused by hepatic angiosarcoma (a malignant tumor of vascular tissue in the liver) between 1964 and 1974. Researchers found 131 reported cases of death from hepatic angiosarcoma. Out of the 131 cases, 3.1% (4 cases) were reported to be at all related to the use of androgenic-anabolic steroids. Keep in mind that these 4 people could have liver complications before any steroids were used, aka a genetic disposition. In fact there is no proof, in this study at least, that the anabolic-androgenic steroids even caused the hepatic angiosarcoma.

    This is the classic case of associating a cause with an effect, without any evidence, aside from both existing. Furthermore, based on the above numbers, there are only 0.4 cases of hepatic angiosarcoma reported each year, by those using AAS. Now consider the number of people on steroids at this time. Now factor in all the people that don’t know their ass from a hole in the ground when it comes to using AAS, properly. Clearly, this is very week evidence. Lastly there has not been a real increase in hepatic angiosarcoma since the early seventies. Meanwhile, there has been a huge, almost exponential, increase in steroid use during this period.

    Another study, that somewhat supports the previous hepatotoxicity case, showed the possibilities of hepatic adenomas(cysts in the liver) caused by androgenic-anabolic steroids[2]. In this study, a Japanese girl was found to have multiple liver lesions after the use of the drug oxymetholone (aka Anadrol). Most everyone “knows” that Anadrol is linked with liver problems, but a closer inspection into this study shows more.

    Apparently, this girl, starting at the age of 14, was diagnosed with aplastic anemia. She was prescribed oxymetholone at 30mg per day. This continued for 6 years until the lesions first appeared. Assuming that the girl was most likely around 100 lbs., this was a pretty heavy dosage. If you extrapolated this data out to a 200 - 250lbs. male, that would be taking approximately 60 - 90mg of anadrol per day for 6 years. Ouch!

    The researchers also stated that there were only 17 other cases of hepatic adenomas, found in English literature between 1975 and 1998. They failed to mention the causes of these 17 cases, but there is no reason to believe they were all using 17-AA androgens and 17 is certainly miniscule compared to the number of people who have used them. The authors’ finish off the study by saying the following: "This report may be helpful in identifying the population who is at risk of developing hepatic sex hormone-related tumors." So remember, if you're a small 14-year-old girl taking 30mg of Anadrol per day for 6 years, you may be at risk!

    Let's move on to some more useful studies. Take for example a 1995 study that showed the toxic effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids in primary rat hepatic cell cultures[3]. In this study the researchers used the following drugs and dosages:

    Steroid
    1x10^-8M
    1x10^-6M
    1x10^-4M
    19-nortestosterone
    0.002744mg
    0.2744mg
    27.44mg
    Fluoxymesterone
    0.003365mg
    0.3365mg
    33.65mg
    Testosterone cypionate
    0.004126mg
    0.4126mg
    41.26mg
    Stanozolol
    0.003285mg
    0.3285mg
    32.85mg
    Danazol
    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
    Oxymetholone
    0.003325mg
    0.3325mg
    33.25mg
    Testosterone
    0.002884mg
    0.2884mg
    28.84mg
    Estradiol
    0.0027424mg
    0.2724mg
    27.24mg
    Methyltestosterone
    0.003024mg
    0.3024mg
    30.24mg

    As proof of the hepatoxicity they used Lactate dehydrogenase release, neutral red retention, and glutathione depletion to determine plasma membrane damage, cell viability, and possible oxidative injury, respectively.

    What they showed was that the 17 alpha-alkylated steroids, methyltestosterone, stanozolol and oxymetholone, significantly increased Lactate dehydrogenase release and decreased neutral red retention at the 1x10^-4M dosage for 24h. Both methyltestosterone and oxymetholone also showed depleted glutathione at the 1x10^-4M dosage after 2h, 6h and 8h treatments. In other words they increased liver activity. You may also note that the other, non-alkylated steroids showed no significant difference in any levels. All in all this not only shows that 17 alpha-alkylated steroids are directly “hepatotoxic”, but also non-alkylated steroids are note hepatotoxic at all. But is this a real measure of hepatotoxicity? There is yet to be any correlation between the increase of the above-mentioned measurement and “hepatotoxicity”. Obviously, high dosages of the 17 alpha-alkylated steroids are potentially dangerous, but upon closer inspection, the study reveals more.

    Take a look, the researchers took cell cultures from the liversse of 60-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Not only are rat livers much smaller than human livers, but these were merely cultures. Furthermore, it was the 1x10^-4M concentrations that caused the most changes, but these are approximately 1 to a 1/3 of a full, daily human dosage -- at least for the 17 alpha-alkylated steroids. Even at the 1x10^-6M concentration, there were no significant changes observed. It's apparent that the levels of 17 alpha-alkylated steroids used were potentially toxic, but for a human to take the same amount would be insane. I'm guessing this could translate to maybe 4 grams every 24 hours or 28 grams a week if not more.

    What is common so far is we can only prove that any steroid, that is believed to be hepatotoxic, only increases liver activity. I’ll say it again, where is the correlation to hepatotoxicity? We know that if the liver is running at 100% for long periods this may cause complications, but this is akin to any other chemical, which is metabolized by the liver. Ever noticed that liver cancer due to alcoholism takes decades of constant alcohol abuse? It’s apparent that the possibility for hepatotoxicity is there, but for the smart steroid user this is nearly an impossible task.

    Another study done in 1999, attempted to show the acute and chronic effects of stanozolol on the liver[4]. In acute treatments of stanozolol, dosages not mentioned, both cytochrome P456 and b5 (microsomal enzymes) levels dropped after 48 hours, and then at 72 hours, levels significant increased. On the other hand, with chronic treatments, time or dosage not mentioned, these microsomal enzymes showed a decrease in levels. Researchers showed that both acute and chronic treatments resulted in "slight to moderate inflammatory or degenerative lesions in centrilobular hepatocytes", but the authors did not note true hepatotoxicity.

    How about we look at the other side of the story, the good studies. For instance, in a 1999 study, which looked at the effects of an 8-week cycle of 17 alpha-alkylated steroids[5]. The researchers used fluoxymesterone, methylandrostanolone, or stanozolol on rats at 2mg/kg-body weight, five times a week for 8 weeks. That's 182mg per dosage, for a 200lb man, or 910mg per week. Half of the rats were sedentary and the other were trained on a treadmill.

    Levels of NADH-cytochrome c reductase, succinate cytochrome c reductase, and cytochrome oxidase (showing liver activity), increased in the steroid-administered rats, while citrate synthase showed no change. Comparatively, in vitro, the "cytochrome oxidase and citrate synthase activities were insensitive to the AAS, whereas NADH-cytochrome c reductase and succinate cytochrome c reductase activities were partly inhibited."

    Furthermore, in vivo, each rat had liver enzyme levels that were within normal range. From this, the researchers determined that the steroid-administered rats, trained or sedentary, did not show "...classical serum indicators of hepatic function". Extrapolating this, 910mg a week for 8 weeks could potentially have little to no effect on the liver in humans.

    As for human studies, in 1999 researchers tried to prove that the hepatotoxicity of steroids is overstated[6]. In this study, 15 of the participants were bodybuilders using self-administered steroid dosages and 10 were non-steroid bodybuilders. Serum data was compared to 49 patients with viral hepatitis, and 592 exercising and non-exercising medical students. [

    All of the bodybuilders showed increases in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) while gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) levels were in the normal range. In comparison, hepatitis patients showed increased ALT, AST, and GGT levels while the control exercising medical students showed increased CK levels. From this, the researchers suggested that it is the correlation between AST, ALT and GGT that shows true liver dysfunction. Keep in mind, we can only guess that the 15 steroid users were using 17 alpha-alkylated steroids, and we do not know what the dosages that were used., but common sense tells us the results are likely relevant.

    Last but not least, a simple study done in 1996, showed the long term benefits after taking a 3 month break from steroids[7]. 16 bodybuilders using steroids were compared to 12 bodybuilders that were not. After a three-month drug withdrawal, the researchers showed that levels of liver enzymes, types not mentioned, returned to the same as the non users. Again the dosages are left to the reader’s imagination and we can only guess that the 16 steroid users were using 17 alpha-alkylated steroids.

    So what can we conclude from all of this? First off, 17 alpha-alkylated steroids are hepatotoxic in high dosages taken for a long time. On the other hand, short cycles and small dosages appear to be perfectly safe. I suggest that maximum dosages should be 500mg to 900mg per day. They should be cycled for perhaps 8 weeks at a time, and if needed a 3-month break from them should be used. Using the above-mentioned techniques, your liver can be healthy for a long time. Simply put, the hysteria surrounding “hepatoxic” steroids, is based mainly on folk lore.
    References:

    [1] Lancet 1979 Nov 24;2(8152):1120-3, Hepatic angiosarcoma associated with androgenic-anabolic steroids. Falk H, Thomas LB, Popper H, Ishak KG.

    [2] J Gastroenterol 2000;35(7):557-62, Multiple hepatic adenomas caused by long-term administration of androgenic steroids for aplastic anemia in association with familial adenomatous polyposis. Nakao A, Sakagami K, Nakata Y, Komazawa K, Amimoto T, Nakashima K, Isozaki H, Takakura N, Tanaka N.

    [3] J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods 1995 Aug;33(4):187-95, Toxic effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids in primary rat hepatic cell cultures. Welder AA, Robertson JW, Melchert RB.

    [4] Arch Toxicol 1999 Nov;73(8-9):465-72, Evaluation of acute and chronic hepatotoxic effects exerted by anabolic-androgenic steroid stanozolol in adult male rats. Boada LD, Zumbado M, Torres S, Lopez A, Diaz-Chico BN, Cabrera JJ, Luzardo OP.

    [5] Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1999 Feb;31(2):243-50, Rat liver lysosomal and mitochondrial activities are modified by anabolic-androgenic steroids. Molano F, Saborido A, Delgado J, Moran M, Megias A.

    [6] Clin J Sport Med 1999 Jan;9(1):34-9, Anabolic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity: is it overstated? Dickerman RD, Pertusi RM, Zachariah NY, Dufour DR, McConathy WJ.

    [7] Int J Sports Med 1996 Aug;17(6):429-33, Body composition, cardiovascular risk factors and liver function in long-term androgenic-anabolic steroids using bodybuilders three months after drug withdrawal. Hartgens F, Kuipers H, Wijnen JA, Keizer HA.
    • 0

    #13
    P A K E

    P A K E

      KFD Gold

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 2666 posts
  • Wiek: 33
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:KFD.PL
    • Staż [mies.]: --
    %-) jutro wrzuce tlumaczenie, teraz nie mam jak bo pisze z komorki %)
    • 0

    #14
    Machine !

    Machine !

      Kulturysta jop twoja mać

    • KFD pro
    • PipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3429 posts
  • Wiek: 32
    • Płeć:Mężczyzna
    • Miasto:Animalownia
    • Staż [mies.]: 12 %)
    Dobry art.

    Czekam na kolejne przetłumaczenie.
    • 0




    0 user(s) are reading this topic

    0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users